CANCELLED — NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

THE NH MAPLE EXPERIENCE AT THE ROCKS HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE CORONA VIRUS.

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

CANCELLED — NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

THE NH MAPLE EXPERIENCE AT THE ROCKS HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE CORONA VIRUS.

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

CANCELLED — NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

THE NH MAPLE EXPERIENCE AT THE ROCKS HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE CORONA VIRUS.

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

Backyard Maple Sugaring Meet & Greet at WREN

Come meet Dave Fuller of Fuller’s Sugarhouse for a maple-tastic pop-up event. During this two-hour meet and greet session, you will learn maple sugaring tips and tricks, sample some of the sweet stuff, and even have the chance to buy your very own backyard maple sugaring starter kit.

Free event.

Fuller’s Sugarhouse is a Sweet Family Affair

Fuller’s Sugarhouse’s pure maple syrup, maple cream and maple candy is sold all over the world — and for good reason. The syrup has been judged “Best in the World” by the North American Maple Syrup Council, and Fuller’s has been awarded the Carlisle Trophy for “Best Maple Syrup in New Hampshire.” Other accolades include making Gourmet magazine’s Top Ten list, and having their maple candy featured in Rachel Ray’s EveryDay magazine as one of the top mail order treats in the US. The best accolade of all is the repeat business of hundreds of customers who won’t purchase their syrup anywhere but at Fuller’s.

Proud owners Dave and Patti Fuller, assisted by Dave’s brother Ed, have built their business from 200 taps and 40 gallons of syrup in 1972 to more than 10,500 taps that produce an amazing 4,000 gallons of syrup!

At Fuller’s Sugarhouse, quality and customer service are #1. A state-of-the-art maple evaporator ensures you are receiving the very best New Hampshire maple syrup available. The secret, says Dave, is in the boiling process and ensuring the maple syrup reaches the correct density.

Open 7 days a week year-round, Fuller’s is especially busy during maple season, when the sap flows and they are boiling. Visitors are invited to stop in for a tour and an explanation of the sugaring process and try an old-fashioned delight, sugar on snow, which is usually available during this time. Groups of people wanting a tour are asked to give a day’s notice, if possible.

Fuller’s Sugarhouse is participating in New Hampshire Maple Weekend on March 25 and 26, a statewide celebration of maple sugaring, when more than 100 sugarhouses around the state welcome visitors with special events and tastings

The Sugarhouse’s fully stocked country store at 267 Main Street in Lancaster, features pottery, artwork, and handmade kitchen items, along with a wide variety of maple products. Fuller’s specializes in gift baskets. All mail orders are filled promptly, and Fuller’s ships around the world.

Can’t get to the Sugarhouse? Fuller’s products are sold in stores and specialty shops around the state, including Whole Foods in Bedford and Nashua, the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport, the I-93 Hooksett Visitor Center General Store, on both the north and southbound sides, and the I-95 Hampton New Hampshire Made Store, both north and southbound, as well as in Massachusetts and Vermont. Fuller’s website has a complete list of locations.

Fuller’s pure maple syrup isn’t just for pancakes. Visit the website to discover dozens of recipes that will convince you to keep the delicious syrup on hand for all your cooking needs.

Fuller’s is open Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

www.fullerssugarhouse.com