NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

Annual Maple Season Dinner at The Rocks

The Rocks will once again celebrate the transition from a long winter to a welcome spring with its annual Maple Dinner on March 27 at 5:30 p.m. This year’s dinner will be held at Chef Joe’s in Franconia following the loss to fire of the program center at The Rocks. Proceeds from the dinner will benefit The Rocks. Programs at The Rocks offer opportunities to learn about maple sugaring, growing Christmas trees and sustainably managing forests and wildlife habitat. The 1,400-acre property has trails open to the public that wind through fields and forest with stunning views of the Presidential Range. For more information please visit www.therocks.org.

NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

NH Maple Experience at The Rocks

Steam billows from the sugarhouse, silver-gray buckets hang from sugar maple trees, and the clop-clop of horses’ hooves serves as a soundtrack during maple sugaring season at The Rocks. As the days warm and lengthen toward springtime, the sweet traditions of sugaring are celebrated here.

“We created the New Hampshire Maple Experience to share both the history and the continuing practice of maple sugaring in New England,” said Nigel Manley, longtime manager at The Rocks, which serves as the North Country Conservation and Education Center for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

“This is a hands-on experience, and we encourage participants to learn about the process of turning sap into maple syrup, from identifying sugar maple trees to tapping a tree to collect sap.”

Maple tours will be offered at The Rocks March 14, 21-22, 28-29, and April 4. Participants will enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride through the historic estate, learning to identify different types of trees along the way. They’ll be invited to tap a sugar maple and take a tractor-drawn wagon ride to The Rocks’ own sugarhouse. There, fourth-generation sugar maker Brad Presby will demonstrate the process of boiling gathered sap into syrup. Adjacent to the sugarhouse is an interactive maple museum, where visitors can see how sugaring has evolved over many years. No maple tour would be complete, of course, without a maple syrup tasting, which includes fresh donuts. Maple tours run from 10 – 4. All activities are included in the cost of $15 ($12 for children). Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling (603) 444-6228 or emailing [email protected]

Ancient Trees & Forests Program at Bretzfelder Park

The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and David Govatski will present “Ancient Trees and Forests” at Bretzfelder Park March 11 at 6 p.m.

The free program is part of the annual winter Bretzfelder Park Family Educational Series. It is free open to the public.

Govatski is a naturalist and author. He retired after a 33-year career with the US Forest Service. He has always loved trees and forests and continues to study and visit forests around the continent. Govatski works in the summer as an expedition ship naturalist in Alaska, where he gets to lead trips in the old-growth forests of the Tongass National Forest.  

Join Govatski for a photographic journey across North America to see the oldest trees and forests starting high up in the White Mountains of California, where we will learn about 5,000-year-old Bristlecone Pines. How some trees live for thousands of years will be explained.

Our journey then takes us to see other trees, including Whitebark and Foxtail Pines that live for over 2,000-years. We will travel to North Carolina’s blackwater swamps to see 2,600-year-old Bald Cypress and to Ontario to learn about 1,600-year-old Northern White Cedar trees. We will visit the Fish Lake National Forest in Utah to learn about the estimated 80,000-year old Pando Aspen clone. We won’t forget the recently discovered “oldest fossil forest” in the world, the 386-million-year-old Cairo, New York, fossil forest. We will finish in New Hampshire, where we will learn that we have the oldest broad-leaf tree in North America, the Black Gum.

Owned by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (www.forestsociety.org), Bretzfelder Park is managed in cooperation with the town of Bethlehem. The Park, bequeathed to the Forest Society in 1984 by Helen Bretzfelder in memory of her father, Charles, houses a classroom, educational trails, a pond, and several picnic sites.

Porcupine Facts and Myths at Bretzfelder Park

Join Nigel Manley, director of The Rocks, to learn about all things porcupines, including fun facts about their quills and why they have a knack for eating wood structures. You will learn about the species of porcupines that inhabit the world as well as the ones here in North America. Manley has tracked porcupines for several years at The Rocks, learning where they den and what they eat during winter months.

The program takes place at Bretzfelder Park in Bethlehem. Learn more at www.therocks.org.

Candle Making Workshop at WREN

Join Helen and Sarah of Country Farm Candles for a fun and informative class that will take you all the way from wick to wax. Over the course of this two-hour workshop, participants will gain hands-on experience in melting wax, selecting fragrances and colors, pouring candles, and more. At the end, you’ll have two 4 oz. mason jar soy candles to take home, as well as a new appreciation for the art and science of candle making, courtesy of one truly dynamic mother/daughter duo.

$35 per person. All materials included. Space is limited to 10 participants.

To register for this workshop, please visit Country Farm Candles’ website at: https://www.countryfarmcandles.com/classes